How to Market and Brand Your Start-Up Accounting Business for Free Online

Starting up an accounting business can seem like an excellent idea, you understand the market and you have something in you that wants to push this forwards and make your idea a reality. The best advice we have is to not let go of that feeling. It can be hard in the current market to do, but if you do, you have a wealth of opportunity right in front of you (pardon the pun). We are here to show you exactly how to market and brand your start-up accounting business for free online.

 

Website

 

The biggest deal for a new accounting business is their website. You have to be on point with everything otherwise customers will not trust you and go with a different server. Ensure that your links work, your pages load and that your instructions are clear. Have a no-nonsense voice for your brand that gets right to the point and answers the questions of people visiting your site before they even ask them.

 

If you can be ahead of the game with your website then you are half way there. If you need a solution to be online, consider these template websites for accounting professionals. Ensure that everything on your website is cohesive. The colors, your business name and logo. Every page needs to be professional and relevant.

 

Ensure that the usability of your website is second to none. People want to understand the site without instruction. Setting up an account and using the site comes secondary, though is still supremely important. But first you need to get your branding on point.

 

Branding

 

Create a brand that is professional, all-knowing and approachable. Have a huge FAQ section with relevant questions and a brand voice that people can rely on. 

 

Create a name for your business that evokes heartfelt trust while at the same time being strong and dependable.

 

Create a logo for your business that works in the world of finance. Choose colours that evoke trust, dependability, power and thoughts of money. Use elements like triangles to show power and squares to show dependability. Make your logo so rich that it gets customers feeling like they can get wealthy just by clicking on it. Then use it everywhere.

 

We have access to an excellent logo creator with many templates and elements you can use; check it out at www.logocreator.io

 

Be Active

 

Be active in publishing about your accounting business. Use social network sites as a springboard to gather people who are interested in the world of finance or small businesses that might want to use your services. Join Facebook groups and trawl LinkedIn for possible custom. Get Tweeting and try to get famous people responding to your tweets.

 

On your social pages, post content daily. You can create brilliant Infographics here, which can give information on finance and accounting to get more people interested in your business. 

 

You should also get making videos. These can be a great way to access as many people as possible. Create short videos that capture people’s attention in the first two seconds. Brand them with your logo and keep them interesting, informative and dependable.

 

Self-Care

 

Starting an accounting business will be stressful. It can mean a lot of hours on the computer feeling like you are getting nowhere. There is a lot of competition out there too, it can be a struggle to get yourself seen.

 

Do not give up. You can do this. But take breaks. Running a small business can take over and before you know it you are working longer hours than you did in the office. This is great short-term and you will probably love it, but after a while it can take its toll.

 

Ensure you have days off per week and hours off each day to spend eating, exploring and doing the things that made you want to set out on your own in the first place. This will shine through in your business management and is important.

 

Don’t go it alone

 

Always remember, with Universal Accounting you can also be in business for yourself but not by yourself.  Check out how and meet the Universal Accounting team here!

Branding Your New Accounting Business On a Tight Budget

As an accountant, you know the importance of setting a budget and sticking to it. Starting your own accounting business will require a disciplined adherence to a budget, and one of the things you need to fit into that budget is branding. Your company’s brand is best described as how your customers feel when they think about your company. No matter what type of brand you’re going for, branding your company is the way you shape how those customers feel. Here are a few things to keep in mind when you’re branding your new accounting company while staying within a budget. 

First, the Name

Your new company has to have a good name that’s easy to say and remember and gives a potential customer an idea of what you’re all about. Many accounting firms just take on the names of their owners, and that’s an acceptable practice; it’s a sign of credibility in the industry and gives you some legitimacy. However, consider coming up with a different name that includes one of these keywords relating to accounting:

 

  • Accounting
  • CPA
  • Bookkeeping
  • Firm
  • Taxes

 

These words will help your online branding by helping your business rank higher on SEO, especially if you can find a way to include one or more of them in your company name. 

Create Your Logo

Your logo is an integral part of your brand. If you’ve branded correctly, seeing your logo should make your customers feel certain emotions, often without them even realizing it. Accountants usually have a professional type of logo; luckily, LogoCreator.io has a variety of templates for almost every industry, so you can make your very own logo without being too outlandish or unusual for the rest of the industry. People like to see some uniqueness, but you still want them to realize that you’re an accounting firm. 

 

Part of creating your logo is determining your company’s color scheme, another important factor that will help guide any promotional items you might have made to distribute, your website design, or even the interior of your offices. You don’t have to spend money in this step, but it is important to consider what colors you want people to associate with your company. Certain colors are also more or less associated with certain emotions; you can find out more about that here

Keep Your Marketing On Brand

Now that you have a name and a logo, you can start marketing your company. You will probably want to consider getting on at least a couple of social media platforms, and you might even consider starting a blog on various accounting topics. You have expertise that other people are looking for, and especially in this field, starting a blog can help build your reputation as an expert accountant. Blogs also give you a good amount of content to share on your social media profile, which helps drive traffic to your site. If people in your area are already used to visiting your site for valuable information, that makes them that much more likely to seek out your services too.

 

However, remember that your content and marketing should be on brand. This means you need to find a voice and tone for your posts, one that doesn’t clash with what you want your business known for. If you need help figuring out a good voice for your branding, you can find some helpful information at Column Five Media.

 

Branding really involves getting people to feel a certain way when they hear about or see your business. It’s the face of your company, and it should be something you put some thought and effort into. Branding your accounting business on a budget isn’t difficult; it just takes some thought and planning to get right. 

 

All of this complements the process to become the premier accounting firm in your area.

:Written by Kristi Horton

How to Save Money on Small Business Taxes

If you are running a small business, you have the right to pay the required taxes and nothing else. In
fact, in most cases, your small business may eligible for tax exemption. Most small business owners
are unaware of these exemptions and end up paying more money taxes than required.

Being an entrepreneur, you should be careful and grab every tax-saving opportunity available
through deductions, credits, depreciation, and payroll-tax reduction. Instead of paying
unnecessary taxes, you can pay only the required ones and keep your profits.

Following are some tips to save more on your taxes:

1. Check with a Qualified Tax Advisor
You are new in the business and confused when it comes to the payment of taxes. This is quite
normal. Before you make any major decision, you are advised to consult a qualified tax
professional. It can positively impact the business's tax return and spending on un-required
taxes.

Choose a tax consultant who is available throughout the year, especially at the time of the tax
payment. Hire an expert who can represent you and your small business in front of the IRC or the
tax authority in your country.

An enrolled agent might be the best option. These enrolled agents are designated by the IRS, and
they have qualified for a strenuous, three-part test, and they work for the IRC at the same niche.

2. Timing the Income and Costs
Timing is important for small businesses for their success. The timing of income involves the
movement of income from one year to another year. Firstly, select the year in which you aim to pay
the most in taxes.

Secondly, reconsider the current expenses before the year comes to an end. It is also advised to pay
a part of that amount so that the income of the current year is less than the expense. Also, a
business can increase its expenses and decrease income legally by making some expenditures,
including stocking up on supplies or paying the office utility or rental bills in advance.

3. Set Up a Retirement Plan
Setting up a retirement plan for yourself and your employees is an excellent way to save on taxes.
This can saves money on taxes. However, the retirement plan must be a qualified plan, so to gain
maximum savings on taxes.

For this purpose, the retirement plan must be recognized by the IRC to allow deferment on taxes on
the earnings till the earnings are withdrawn. These include IRA s and proper plans of contribution.
This is a normal practice done by most of the businesses these days not only to gain more from the
taxes but also to keep the employees loyal to the business.

4. Avail Tax Credits
Tax credits are exemptions from tax offered by the government if your business meets certain
requirements. It is a technique used by the government to reward individuals and small businesses
for good tax behavior. It encourages entities to pay taxes on time and follow good tax practices.

For example, Carpet Cleaning London takes tax credits for hiring employees, uses recycled
resources, provides access to disabled employees and the general public, and also provides health
coverage for the workers.

You can check with your local, state, or federal tax authorities to see what requirements are
mandatory to become eligible for tax credits.

5. Avail Tax Write-off on Equipment and Vehicles
Small business owners can take tax write-offs on the purchase of equipment, other machinery,
and vehicles. At times a small business can also take a tax write-off on the purchase/renting of
real estate property.

These write-offs can either be taken in the first year after the equipment or machinery is bought or
later. Did you know that the two basic types of accelerated depreciation are Section 179 deductions
and bonus depreciation?

This kind of depreciation is applied immediately when the machinery or vehicle bought comes into
service.

  • Bonus Depreciation:

This kind of depreciation is an extra benefit for the bought assets. From September 27, 2017,
through January 1, 2023, The TCJA also maximized this tax break from 40% to 100% of the cost for
assets when used.

6. Minus the Costs of the Gifts
A small business owner can also minus the costs of the gifts given to the stakeholders, including the
customers and vendors. This deduction can go up to $25 per person. However, an exception is
always there, for instance, for your business franchise.

Subtracting the costs of amusement or refreshment is a bit problematic if an entrepreneur shows
his appreciation by paying for quality time. These costs are not included unless the amusement
event t is directly related to the business.

7. Deduct Car Expenses
You can also deduct car expenses from your tax payments. What a wise entrepreneur should do is
that instead of showing the actual car expenses, they should only show the standard mileage rate
set by the IRS.

For 2012 the rate was 50 cents, and for 2013, the rate is 52 cents. A small business owner can
minus every mile that they drove in the car for businesses related work, even if it is in their
personal car.

Keep a logbook so that when claiming the deduction, it is easy to look at the total number of the
trips, areas of the trip covered, and what were the readings of the odometer.

8. Hire your Family Members
Hiring your family or friends in your small business can help the business owners to save a lot on
taxes. Instead of giving your family members or kids after the tax money, why don’t you hire them
in the business? Hiring them would be helpful.

They would do real work. For the tax year 2013, a business owner can pay them up to $5,900 per
year that they collect tax-free, and it gets canceled by the standard deduction. The owner might
pay payroll taxes for them since the business can expense the family members of the kid’s payroll
and minimize the taxes.

Final Thoughts

For small business owners, the above tips must help save money on taxes, but it is to be noted
that these tips are not intended to be tax advice in actuality. These are just the ideas that can help
them in saving more.

These are items to consider when working with your tax clients as their Professional Tax Preparer with offering quality accounting services.

Author Bio:
Shaheryar provides ghostwriting and copywriting services. His educational background in the technical field and business studies helps him in tackling topics ranging from career and business productivity to web development and digital marketing.

Ideal Accounting Skills for Working with a Not-for-Profit

Needed across industries and sectors of the economy, accountants play vital roles in maintaining the financial success of any endeavor. In the not-for-profit world, accountants take on the job of securing resources and reducing operating costs to help task-driven organizations achieve more good in the world.

 

Many accountants likely see this as a good enough reason to pursue accounting as a career. Through managing nonprofit budgets and expenditures, an accountant can indirectly serve individuals and communities in need. Even ministers have switched careers to capitalize on the amount of good they could achieve through accounting.

 

But not-for-profit work isn’t the same as traditional accounting work. While many of the same skills apply, accountants in the nonprofit world must hone a unique set of talents. Here’s what you should know.

How Non-Profit Accounting Differs

Many accountants making the transition from work in the for-profit world face a steep learning curve when starting with a non-profit. These economic sectors differ, composed, and driven by different goals and overall missions. While for-profit companies will be more focused on bottom lines, not-for-profits look more at their overall goals and the ways they are using their resources.

 

Accountants in this new environment must be clear on these differences and explore how alternative goals affect accounting work in general. For instance, for-profit entities operate using an often singular ledger system that details revenues and expenditures in a self-balancing account. Not-for-profits, on the other hand, operate with a series of resources and ledgers that must be balanced for ideal application.

 

In conducting this work, there are all kinds of varying terms and practices for accountants to learn. For example, retained earnings become net assets and a net income means an excess of revenues. Rather than an income statement, non-profit accountants create a statement of operations.

 

While these differences may seem primarily semantic, they represent the different goals and practices that drive non-profits versus for-profit businesses. With a non-profit, you don’t want money left over: you want an organization that is doing the most with what it has.

 

That said, there are many useful skills that a not-for-profit accountant can hone to bring greater success to their organization.

Invaluable Skillsets for Not-for-Profit Accountants

First, while accountants can certainly specialize in non-profit work from their undergraduate program onward, any professional with an accounting degree can translate their skills into success with a not-for-profit organization. 

 

Then, it is simply a matter of learning the differences and finding methods to improve the flow of finances and resources towards non-profit goals. Aside from being adept at navigating the nuances of tax-exempt status as a 501(c)(3) organization, not-for-profit accountants require skills like the following:

Excellent Organizational Abilities

For any accountant, the ability to manage a ledger system complete with all its fluctuating account details is a must. For non-profits, however, the impetus for ideal organization is even stronger. Nonprofits depend on efficiently maintained records to prove their tax-exempt status and be able to highlight processes for investors and stakeholders.

 

Auditing experience is a highly desirable trait of a non-profit accountant as a result. With the ability to organize and review records to prove compliance with investor and governmental requirements, accountants can keep a non-profit smoothly functioning. 

Effective Management of Tight Budgets

The majority of not-for-profit organizations operate with budgets of less than $1 million. Because of this, accountants in the industry need to keep a sharp eye out for any place they can reduce operational costs while also guaranteeing that donor and grant money goes where it needs to go. 

 

Non-profits are often limited by money given with specific donor restrictions. It is the job of the accountant to ensure that these restrictions are being met and reported within financial documentation. This takes attention to detail and great problem-solving skills. 

Quality Communication

One of the most important qualities for any accountant is the ability to communicate financial information. This is even more important in the not-for-profit sector, where donors want specific things and your organization has a mission to fulfill. 

 

Honing your communication skills can be one of the best ways to excel as a non-profit accountant. This takes empathy and clarity, as well as a willingness to be open to questions and concerns. Any member of your organization should be able to come to you with a question and come away with a clear explanation. Teammates should also be able to contribute with useful feedback and clarify practices wherever necessary. 

 

Implementing these ideal skills into your own toolset can be a great way to maximize the potential of your not-for-profit. If you’re just getting started in the non-profit sector, demonstrating these skills can help get your foot in the door. 

Improving your Status as a Non-Profit Accountant

Getting started as a non-profit accountant requires proper networking and professional qualities. While improving your skills, you can adapt your work and academic experience to write a great accounting resume. In turn, you’ll be able to improve your status as a non-profit accountant and land work with your dream organization. 

 

Your ability to do so, however, will come down to how well you showcase your skills on your resume. Highlight your soft skills like listening and communicating effectively alongside harder skills like experience with certain accounting software. Translate relevant job experience into applicable traits for non-profit work, or express a willingness to learn and adapt. 

 

Not-for-profits need skilled and attentive accountants to streamline the effectiveness of their resources. Demonstrating effective organization, budget management, and communication skills can help you get in the door with the non-profit of your choice. 

 

Then, hone these skills to ensure that your organization does the most good that it is capable of doing. By implementing skillsets and strategies like these, accountants can make a real difference in the world.

Lastly, become a certified Professional Bookkeeper that is both trained and certified in both For-Profit & Non-Profit accounting.

Reasons to Pursue a Career in Accounting

If you’re good with numbers and interested in a well-paying, stable career path, it may be time to turn your attention to accounting. In fact, according to the Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections, the employment of accountants is projected to grow by four percent by 2029. 

 

If that’s not reason enough to strongly consider this career, here’s another statistic from the Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections: The median annual wage for accountants, as of May 2019, is $71,550. This is much higher than the median annual wage for all occupations, which sits at $53,490. And although the pay is certainly an influencing factor for most when choosing an accounting career path, it isn’t the only reason why it’s become so popular.

Accounting Career Paths

Unlike some career fields, in which there’s only one path to travel, there’s more than what meets the eye when it comes to accounting. Generally speaking, you’ll choose one of the following routes:

 

  • Managerial: Managerial accountants generate documents that are used internally within a company. This can include documents such as those used for tax purposes and recurring expenses. 
  • Financial: Financial accountants generate documents, such as balance sheets and a variety of income statements, which are used by outside parties, such as investors. 

 

By understanding the similarities and differences between managerial and financial accounting, it’s easier to decide which path you’re most passionate about.

 

With that in mind, let’s examine some of the most common types of accountants:

 

  • Staff Accountant: For many individuals with a bachelor’s degree in accounting, this is the first job they seek. Reporting to a CPA, you’ll take on responsibilities such as creating financial reports and analyzing a variety of data. You’ll also use a variety of tools, such as a cash flow calculator, to track progress and make informed decisions. 
  • Certified Public Accountant (CPA): From the outside looking in, it’s easy to believe that CPAs focus on nothing more than the preparation of state and federal tax returns. However, this career path goes much deeper than that. For example, companies often hire a CPA to oversee other accountants. 
  • Investment Accountant: Investment accountants typically work for financial management or investment management firm. With this career, you have the opportunity to help individuals and companies make better investments, such as sharing advice on how specific decisions will affect their taxes. 
  • Project Accountant: As the name implies, project accountants are hired to manage a specific project. Some of the tasks they may take on include preparing invoices, maintaining budgets, and managing and approving expenses. In many cases, project accountants are hired on a contract basis. 
  • Cost Accountant: The primary responsibility of a cost accountant is to maintain cost efficiency on behalf of an organization. However, unlike a project accountant, these individuals are generally hired on a full-time basis. 
  • Management Accountant: There’s no shortage of management accountant responsibilities, which often include external financial reporting, budgeting, and creating reports on the overall financial health of an organization. 

While these are among the most common accounting career paths, there are others to consider as you gain experience and come to better understand what you’re most passionate about. However, no matter the type of accounting path you may choose, there are plenty of benefits as well.

Top Reasons to Become an Accountant

There’s no shortage of reasons to become an accountant, but there’s something you must remember: It takes a lot of hard work and dedication to reach your goal, so you must be 100 percent confident that it’s the right career path for you.

 

Here are five reasons to consider this career:

 

  • Above-average pay: As noted above, the median annual wage for accountants is more than $71,000/year. 
  • Job security: Every organization needs accountants, so job security is typically high. 
  • Career advancement opportunities: As you gain experience and knowledge, you can seek out career advancement opportunities within your company and at other employers. For example, after several years of working as a staff accountant, you may want to consider becoming a CPA.
  • The opportunity to be your own boss: There may come a point when you realize that you no longer want to work for someone else. As an accountant, you can start your firm, such as helping individuals and/or companies with tax preparation.
  • Puzzle-solving fun: Accounting isn’t everyone’s idea of fun, but if you like working with numbers it could be the perfect career path.

What’s Next?

Now that you better understand the reasons to pursue a career in accounting, it’s time to answer one very important question: Are you ready to head down this path?

 

If the answer is yes, assess your situation and decide what you need to do next. Become a trained and certified Professional Bookkeeper. Once you have the right education and training, it’s time to land your first job. With the help of our job placement assistance program, it won’t be long before you have a career that puts a smile on your face, money in your pocket, and joy in your heart.

Next Page »